Loosing your grip on camera gear

Losing a grip on your photo gear

When you’re focused on your gorgeous surroundings and with getting that PERFECT shot, there may be consequences to your preoccupation. Jay’s short video addresses this potential misstep. Keeping his simple solution in mind could save your valuable equipment.

About Author Jay Patel

I could startoff like this – “Seeds of Jay Patel’s appreciation for beautiful places were planted early in his childhood….” but it would get boring really fast. I will just sum it up and say that I am a Landscape and Wilderness Photographer who loves to capture dramatic light. My photographs have been published in various magazines, calendars and advertising materials throughout the world.

Patience is a virtue...unless you are chasing your dreams

Landscape

Free Landscape Photography eBooks

Build a stunning portfolio with Free eBooks, Photo Tips, Inspirational Stories, & Discounts from InFocus Newsletter.

Please check your email to confirm your subscription

18 replies
  1. Jeff Sinon
    Jeff Sinon says:

    Lesson learned. I usually take the strap off of my cameras because it gets blown by the wind and potentially causes camera movement. Recently my tripod was blown over on the ice while photographing the Milky Way. Fortunately everything survived, though the lens now has a small piece of plastic missing from the focus ring. The strap is now back on the camera and I don’t intend to let it go.

    Reply
  2. ulrich tutsch
    ulrich tutsch says:

    This is the way I secure my tripod. I get all my equipment ready (filter in a pocket on me, cable release or other release attached to the camera. Before I install the camera on the tripod, I hang up my backpack at the bottom of the vertical column of my tripod. Then I attach the camera to it. Still, you have to be careful and NOT take things for granted.

    Reply
  3. Geoff
    Geoff says:

    Hi thanks for your tip, Sadly it has come about 4 months to late for me as I lost one
    of my canon cameras plus tripod and lens a filter holder with two filters in it it fell about
    800 ft, I did not even bother going down to try and retrieve it (did not see the point) also
    I had left my dust pan and brush at home LOL and still crying.

    Reply
  4. Bruce
    Bruce says:

    Love your tips for photographers. Follow you monthly and always enjoy your practical approach to creating memorable images. I recommend you to all my clients.

    Reply
  5. Mike Hardisty
    Mike Hardisty says:

    I’ve lost a lens by not checking that my tripod leg had been secured properly. Extended the legs fully but forgot to tighten the end section on one of the legs. It collapsed and the tripod fell over damaging a Sigma 10-20mm WA lens. An expensive forget..

    Reply
  6. Anne Forbes
    Anne Forbes says:

    I have always,by instinct, kept the camera strap around my neck when the camera is on the tripod, or, if not, I never let go of the camera. so, this video is a timely reminder.

    Reply
  7. Peti Morgan
    Peti Morgan says:

    I am more likely to drop my filters! Especially the polarising filter, which is the most difficult to remove, and the most expensive – argh! 😉

    Reply
  8. Tania Court
    Tania Court says:

    Haven’t done it with a camera attached but I’ve lost two tripods that way – normally when I’m putting the camera away 🙂

    Reply
  9. lauren pupillo
    lauren pupillo says:

    I’ve done that one…
    Fortunately, I recovered the camera and lens from the bottom of the mountain. Unfortunately, they were trashed.

    Experience is the best teacher.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Please prove that you are human by solving the equation * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.